Untrashed: The Incredible Gallery of New York City Garbage

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March 2nd, 2016 3 comments
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Several years ago, my uncle was taking out the garbage when he spied, in the trash room of his Washington, DC apartment building, a box of spiral notebooks. Each one was a journal recounting a young woman’s personal and professional life in post-war Washington, peppered with appearances by the era’s most famous politicians and journalists. Intrigued, he took the box to his apartment and began to read. The author had been one of the only female reporters covering Congress and the White House, and her stories testified to the challenge, intrigue and isolation of being a working woman in the capital of the 1950s and ’60s. My uncle read through the accounts with awe, and some horror that they might have ended up in the incinerator had he not found them first. But what ethical (or legal) standing did he have to intervene, against the wishes of the woman herself, or some family member? In the end, he felt he had no choice but to throw them out.

The finality of garbage feels like a right. But the minute you put your trash on the curb, it becomes the property of New York City. If you live in the square bounded by 1st Avenue, 5th Avenue, 96th Street, and 110th Street, some of the things you’ve thrown out may have wound up on the second floor of a Department of Sanitation garage on East 99th Street. That territory was for three decades the route of Nelson Molina, the sanitation worker who has curated the multitudinous Treasure in the Trash collection.

Here, in a room the size of a hockey rink, Molina mends what we break, cherishes what we discard, and displays what we think is gone forever. His collection includes African masks, a film projector, beaded Indian purses, crystal decanters, model trains, ivory cigarette cases, stainless steel ship cleats, government bonds, diplomas, musical instruments, typewriters, army helmets, lunchboxes, and a jungle of thriving houseplants. There are easily a thousand discrete objects here, representing only a small handful — geographically and temporally — of New York refuse.

Treasure in the Trash does not proffer judgment on its unwitting contributors. These are sooner tokens of culture and history than trappings of old lives. What did we frame? How did we play?  These objects have been, as the anthropologist Robin Nagle put it, redeemed. “Nelson has untrashed them,” she said.

Nagle, the author of Picking Up: On the Streets and Behind the Trucks with the Sanitation Workers of New York City, has become an advocate for preserving Molina’s collection. The leaky-roofed garage in which it sits will be demolished in the next few years, at which point the future of Treasure in the Trash is undetermined. Unlike the NYPD or the FDNY, the DSNY does not yet have a museum. But when it does, Nagle hopes Molina’s collection will be an important feature.

On a recent Saturday, photographer Lana Barkin toured Treasure in the Trash with Molina. Through her photos, we can see that Molina has neatly — perhaps better than anyone else — fulfilled Claes Oldenburg’s maxim: “Look for beauty where it is not supposed to be found.”

H.G. 

Click any image to launch a slideshow | Nelson Molina in his “Treasure in the Trash” collection

Baseball paraphernalia, including a ticket to the last game played at Shea Stadium, and Christmas decorations share a wall at the entrance to the collection

Molina removes a Star of David forged from steel from the Twin Towers from a case of odds and ends, which it shares with a Nazi war medal

Molina sometimes assembles his pieces, joining lamps with lampshades, or forging a scooter from a roller skate and a two-by-four. Here, he gestures to a trash-made Hillary Clinton

Presidential figurines, an old pair of glasses, and a pearl necklace

The appearance of homespun disarray is illusory; Molina knows instantly if anything has been moved

An original contact print of a soldier with his sword

Molina holds a piece of the rail from the Third Avenue El, which closed in Manhattan in 1955 and was torn down shortly thereafter

Molina projects a silent movie from his collection. (Both were found in the trash, as was a nearby working stereo.)

One major sub-category in Molina’s collection is children’s toys. Some are timeless

Others reflect a succession of fads. Furbies and Furblings in repose. Tamagotchis lie nearby

Trolls had their day in the 1960s, again in the 1990s, and have been thrown away ever since.

The collection is organized by category and by color, drawing connections between otherwise unrelated objects

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A particularly lousy model of vacuum cleaner makes a repeat appearance

Now that Molina has retired, his colleagues send their own finds

Recycle more, waste less

“If I took three months, I could furnish a two-bedroom apartment,” Molina says

The entrance to the museum, on East 99th Street

The Treasure in the Trash collection does not have regular public hours. Inquiries about visiting may be addressed to tours@dsny.nyc.gov

Lana Barkin is a photographer from New York City. She has a BA from Bard College, where she studied photography and philosophy. Her work has been shown in publications and exhibitions including Paper Magazine, Musee Magazine, Vogue.com, and the Bruce High Quality Foundation’s final group show, The Last Brucennial. You can see more of her photos on her website.



3 Responses to “Untrashed: The Incredible Gallery of New York City Garbage”

  1. Jamie Jensen says:

    Thank you for the wonderful images! I was fortunate to get a tour of Nelson Molina’s Treasures in the Trash collection, and I hope that the more people hear about them, the more momentum will build to save them.

    With the Dept of Sanitation about to start building a new recycling / transfer station at the old Gansevoort Peninsula, next to Gordon Matta Clark’s old Day’s End artwork and Hudson River Park, now is the time to start working toward including a “creative recycling” educational component which could display Nelson’s treasures while highlighting the need to reduce NYC’s waste stream.

    Hey Architectural League — adding art to the new Grimshaw-designed Marine Transfer Station would make a great ideas competition!

    Last summer the City quietly released an RFP: number is 8502015TR0005P but this discussion should be much higher profile…

    DSNY has ~ $180 Million of public money to build the new waste transfer station, and investing even .1% of that to show off Mr Molina’s treasures while highlighting the amazing job DSNY does — from trash collection to snow plowing — would be money well spent!

    Thank you Lana Barkin, Dr. Robin Nagle, and Urban Omnibus!

  2. Sammy says:

    This place looks amazing. I hope these items don’t get trashed again. I would really want to see it one day.

  3. Pam Laskin says:

    This is spectacular and fascinating!!!!

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