Staying Power: Organizing for Affordable Housing in New York City, Past and Present

An exhibition at the Interference Archive illuminates the long history and remarkable continuity of organizing for affordable, safe, and stable housing in New York City.

Maintaining NYCHA: Debunking the Myth of Unmanageable High-Rise Public Housing

In an excerpt from the new book Public Housing Myths: Perception, Reality, and Social Policy, Nicholas Dagen Bloom challenges the assumption that high-rise public housing is fundamentally unmanageable by examining the history and vital importance of NYCHA’s dedicated maintenance staff.

The Bronx's Lambert Houses and the Two Sides of Preservation

As plans to redevelop a once-lauded residential complex come to light, Susanne Schindler questions the lack of cultural recognition for the city's diverse and innovative history of housing design and argues for architectural and financial preservation of our affordable housing stock.

Housing Beyond the Market: Transatlantic Precedents

Can limited profit be good business and create better housing?

Typecast: Towers in the Park

Innovation and Neglect: Sea Rise and Sea Park East

In our final Typecast installment exploring towers-in-the-park, Maura Ewing chronicles the lives of two Coney Island housing developments and exposes the political context that undergirds their architectural innovation, construction shortcomings, and the deferred maintenance that threatens their viability as affordable housing assets.

Debating Privatization: Southbridge Towers Votes

Charles Chawalko relates the tension surrounding his coop’s upcoming vote on its future in the Mitchell-Lama affordable housing program.

Architecture vs. Housing: The Case of Sugar Hill

Susanne Schindler's in-depth analysis of Sugar Hill, an iconic new housing and cultural complex in Harlem, suggests new ways to broaden limited ideas about what architecture can contribute to housing for low-income residents.

Fighting for Tenant Rights on the Lower East Side

Soaring rent can often seem like a vague, mysterious force, like bad weather, for which no one in particular is responsible.

Picture the Homeless Hits the Pavement

Marcus Moore and Sam Miller of Picture the Homeless, an organization led by homeless and formerly homeless people, discuss their activism on issues of affordable housing, police harassment, and shelter reform.

Profiles in Public Service

Hard Units: A Drive through Jersey City with Brian Loughlin

Brian Loughlin, the chief architect for the Jersey City Housing Authority, takes us on a tour of recent renovations and rehabilitations, demonstrating the architectural innovation and policy acumen required to navigate federal housing programs and create sound homes and neighborhoods.