Dispatches

Everyone Has Something to Give, Everyone Has Something That They Need

With so many New Yorkers sick, out-of-work, and risking arrest at the front lines of protests, Crown Heights Mutual Aid has been pooling human and economic resources to help their neighbors-in-need. We hear from some of the group's members about the city's rapidly evolving landscape of care, the importance of staying local, and the challenges of being in it for the long haul.

Dispatches

Communications, con Cariño

Greta Byrum of Community Tech NY talks about the importance of grassroots digital networks in keeping people connected during disasters.

Ship Shape

The on-demand economy demands a lot from New York City’s streets. How might logistics better integrate with the city’s sidewalk ballet?

Digital Frictions

Caught in the Spotlight

Networked technologies are setting the stage for new forms of urban surveillance. From Amazon’s Ring doorbell to the Detroit Police Department’s Project Green Light, what kinds of performances do digital tracking tools encourage people to put on?

Digital Frictions

A Tour of Some Logistics Landscapes

From satellites to elevators, the technologies that coordinate the on-demand economy also organize our sense of what kind of world is possible and desirable.

Digital Frictions

Unruly Bits

New digital technologies promise to fix common bugs and glitches in construction. But as the story of the world’s second-tallest modular tower reveals, the labor, politics, and material complexity of building don’t always follow rules of computation.

Digital Frictions

Disruption at the Doorstep

Facial recognition. Tenant screening platforms. Biometric databases. A new set of digital products seeks to disrupt the real estate industry. But these technologies are fast becoming weaponized against a familiar target of housing discrimination: working-class tenants of color.

Digital Frictions

Accessibility, Augmented

From video-enabled visual interpretation to 3D audio effects, smartphone wayfinding apps have a lot to offer Blind users. But these new features are no substitute for public infrastructure — digital or otherwise — that accounts for nonvisual navigation of the built environment.