Typecast: Row House

The Row House on Rising Waters

For our Typecast series, Henry Grabar visits Canarsie, where long rows of attached brick houses defy traditional flood-proofing elevation. Could rising flood insurance premiums pose a greater immediate threat to homeowners than rising sea levels?

In the Same Room Without Screaming

Can public art, oral history, and open dialogue help rebuild burned bridges between estranged community groups? Gabrielle Bendiner-Viani recounts her experience in the Lower East Side's Seward Park Urban Renewal Area (SPURA).

Building Back the Bungalow

After Superstorm Sandy, a historic housing style is on the brink of extinction on Staten Island's East Shore. A. F. Brady explores what stands to be lost, and gained, in government efforts to rebuild the area after the storm.

City Squares: Generous Public Space

The anthology, like the public square, is a gathering place for a diversity of voices.

Profiles in Public Service

The Immigrant Metropolis: An Interview with Nisha Agarwal

In the latest installment of our Profiles in Public Service series, Nisha Agarwal, commissioner of the Mayor's Office of Immigrant Affairs, talks to Urban Omnibus about fraud in the housing market and confidence in librarians.

Mapping Gowanus Today, Imagining Gowanus Tomorrow

Allison Henry explores seven proposals for the future of the Gowanus Canal.

The Korean Shrine of Fort Greene

How a Protestant denomination went from Brooklyn to Seoul — and back to Brooklyn again

Man of the Crowd: Edgar Allan Poe, Bronx Hero

Poe Cottage in the Bronx is writing hip-hop into the story of Edgar Allan Poe. Should other historic house museums take note?

Bronx Farm Helps Refugees Put Down Roots

Two refugees, a longtime community member, and the International Rescue Committee's New Roots program manager tell us how a Bronx garden melds resettlement efforts, job training, and good ole' fashioned community building, served up with a side of bitter melon.

Embedding Histories in a Changing Prospect Heights

Gabrielle Bendiner-Viani shares stories of significant personal places from six Prospect Heights residents in the early 2000s and introduces a project to make visible those stories in the very different landscape of the contemporary neighborhood.