The Location of Justice: Streets

Yes Sitting, Yes Skating, Yes Music

Where can teenagers hang out and be safe in public?

The Location of Justice: Structures

Structures: Perspectives

The buildings where fates, freedoms, and justice are decided sit at the center of our image of the justice system. What form should they take? How should they work?

The Location of Justice: Structures

Siting Rikers' Replacements

The city's plans call for new borough jails to replace those at Rikers. A set of drawings examines land uses in the boroughs' civic centers to consider: Can New Yorkers accept jails as neighbors?

The Location of Justice: Structures

Retrofit for Fairness

The city oversees an experiment: Can new signage and instructions improve experiences in New York’s busiest criminal courthouse?

Housing Brass Tacks

Housing Court

A housing court case can make the difference between safe at home and out on the street. Jenny Laurie of Housing Court Answers explains how it works and what throws the scales of housing justice out of balance.

Housing Brass Tacks

Limited-Equity Co-Ops

If owning a home means security, stability, and the American Dream, those remain out of reach for most apartment-dwelling New Yorkers. But can limited-equity co-ops provide another way?

Housing Brass Tacks

Community Land Trusts

These days, “CLT” is a watchword for affordable housing and anti-displacement activists nationwide, including the residents and organizers behind a South Bronx initiative that’s building steam.

Housing Brass Tacks

Illegal Hotels

Like many companies in the “sharing economy,” Airbnb prides itself on “disrupting” the traditional marketplace — but at what cost to New York’s affordable housing?

The Location of Justice: Structures

A Jail to End All Jails

Mayor de Blasio promises to close the Rikers Island jail complex in ten years. But what comes next? A look at the island’s history reveals clues — and cautions.

The Location of Justice: Structures

What Jail Can't Do

Frank Greene and Kenneth Ricci discuss the changing paradigms of half a century of justice architecture and what we should ask — and expect — from courts and jails.