TOPIC

History

The Location of Justice: Structures

Due Process and the Enclosure of Justice

What is gained, and what is lost, when justice takes place outside public view?

The Location of Justice: Structures

A Jail to End All Jails

Mayor de Blasio promises to close the Rikers Island jail complex in ten years. But what comes next? A look at the island’s history reveals clues — and cautions.

What's In a Roofline?

The humble gambrel roofs of Queens’ Dutch Colonial houses cover the borough’s complex history.

Underexposed

Underexposed | 4

Hidden in Central Park, the remains of a 19th century reservoir that fell out of fashion.

Who Makes the Many Harlems?

Integration without gentrification? Self-determination without segregation? Who has the power to determine Harlem’s future?

Typecast: Row House

The Bible and the Billionaire

Emily Schmidt spins the origin story of the affordable row house in the 1980s, when pastors and businessmen sowed scorched earth with rows of new homes.

Shelf Life

Has Any City Ever Planned for Love?

For Shelf Life, a film made in 1964 provides an enduring lens through which to look at density's delights.

Housing Brass Tacks

Public Housing Transformed

Catherine Fennell and Crystal Palmer, two authorities on Chicago's public housing transformation, probed the problematic mythos of public housing—from the "failure" of tower complexes to the virtues of mixed-income redevelopment.

Obstruction for Justice

How can protestors get their points across to an unyielding city? Oksana Mironova shows how gumming up the works may trump gathering in the square.

Underexposed

Underexposed | 1

In the new series, Underexposed, photographer Stanley Greenberg's monthly dispatches trace the myriad paths of the city’s infrastructural networks in great breadth and close detail.

Shelf Life

Architecture in the Basement

In the first installment of Shelf Life, Janet Parks, curator of the Avery Drawings and Archives at Columbia University, takes us through its architectural underworld, uncovering the collection's treasures.

The Story of Squats

Why does the history of squatting in New York matter? Artists, historians, documentarians, and writers reflect on a singular passage in the city's story, and what it can offer today.

Codes of Conduct

Happy Birthday, zoning! The codes may have changed over 101 years, but as Andrea Renner and Eric Goldwyn explain, when it comes to how New Yorkers use zoning to advance their own visions of a perfect city, much remains the same.

Gotham in the Gallery

What makes New York, New York? A new permanent exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York takes on just that question; curator Sarah Henry explains why formulating the right answer is impossible — and beside the point.

Making Sense of Model Cities

Historians of and planners from the era of Model Cities give their take on the lessons and legacies of this often-overlooked program.

Model Cities Redux

As the city makes moves to improve housing in Mott Haven, Susanne Schindler finds that current approaches bear a strong resemblance to long-forgotten efforts there.

City as Playground

Artist Julia Jacquette and writer James Trainor discuss Jacquette's graphic memoir, Playground of My Mind, digging into the sandbox of their memories and a critical chapter in the history of New York City's public spaces.

Typecast: Row House

The Magnate-Messiah of the Upper West Side

This week on Typecast, Allison Henry tells the tale of Clarence True, a 19th century architect-developer who believed he alone could save the row house from mundanity.

Typecast: Row House

The Tudor Plain

For our Typecast series, Thomas J. Campanella traces the development of Brooklyn's vast southern plain, a landscape of storybook neo-Tudor row houses thanks to Depression-era builders like Fred Trump.

Leaf Head: A New Yorker Learns to Look at Trees

When Russell Jacobs started identifying trees, he found history, conflict, and company in an overlooked component of the streetscape.